Diving Cenderawasih Bay Podcast

Diving Cenderawasih Bay in Indonesia is a must-do for those who want prolonged, up-close whale shark encounters. But this vast underwater wilderness has plenty more to amaze visitors, as Tim Rock explains

Whale sharks seen while diving Cenderawasih Bay, Indonesia

Subscribe to the Dive Happy podcast on iTunes Subscribe to the Dive Happy podcast on Pocket Casts Subscribe to the Dive Happy podcast on Overcast Subscribe to the Dive Happy podcast RSS feed

Diving Cenderawasih Bay – Dive Happy Episode 3 Show Notes

Cenderawasih Bay Map

Cenderawasih Resorts And Liveaboards Mentioned

Dive Happy Cenderawasih Bay Trip Reports

Indonesia’s Main Dive Site Locations

Divehappy Indonesia Diving map

Diving Cenderawasih Bay – Dive Happy Episode 3 Summary

The Dive Sites of Cenderawasih Catching The Eyes of Many.

Cenderawasih is another remarkable place to go diving in Indonesia, which is effectively just around the corner from Raja Ampat. The area has only recently opened up, and Cenderawasih has only been dived for the last 10 years. It’s fairly new, it’s not quite on everybody’s dive map yet. But what really put it on the agenda of many divers is the fact that it has a fairly constant sighting of wale sharks where people can actually dive with them throughout the day. That really caused people to take notice and all of a sudden Cenderawasih really caught everybody’s attention. Part of it’s beauty is that there’s only one way in and out of the bay up in the north. This has left the area isolated from the rest of the ocean world, thus it has quite a few unusual endemics including a long nose butterfly fish with different coloration than others seen around the world, and even a different kind of walking shark.

Cenderawasih Carries A Significant History on It’s Shoulders.

There is an island located just north of the bay called Biak which has a very significant World War II history, as well as a really significant local history of the Biak people themselves. There are incredible skull caves with areas with hundreds and hundreds of skulls from times when the Biak people used to go out and fight their enemies in the Padaido islands close by. They would then bring back the bodies back and put the skulls on the cliff line to scare away anybody that wanted to come and take over some of the Biak tribe land. There are big lime stone cliffs and outside of Biak city there is beautiful jungle. As you come south down passed Manokwari, there are several World War II shipwrecks, and Biak has a Catalina seaplane that divers can explore. Farther down the coast, there’s a Japanese Zero sitting up on a reef, so if you are a wreck diver, you can get your fix there.

The Unexplored Territory Makes Cenderawasih a Divers Paradise.

When travelling through the bay on the liveaboards, you can visit the coast line and wind up and down to the whale sharks and kind of repeat on your way back. But some of the islands out there have yet to be discovered. There is a big area with sunken atolls where divers can do some exploration. It has nice flowing currents and lots of schools of fish with sightings of absolutely huge stands of big cabbage coral, lettuce corals, and immense barrel sponges. The sponge life is really beautiful and there is a lot more to discover, which is part of the excitement of Cenderawasih. The more boats that go down and start discovering the area, straying away from the already documented dive spots, the more they are going to find.

The “Star Sharks” Bring Luck to the Cenderawasih Fishermen.

Cenderawasih has fishing platforms that are brought up on a weekly basis, up into the south central part of the bay where people can fish from. They are very large platforms and holding approximately eight fisherman on each platform. The platforms have a small generator on them with lights, and at night the lights are turned one, which attracts all kinds of bait fish. The fishermen drop their big nets down underneath the platform and when all the small fish swim up, the haul them up. The whale Sharks discovered this and started coming up to try and suck the small fish out of the nets. So in order to keep the whale sharks from damaging the nets, the fishermen started feeding them instead. They considered them good luck and they called them hubintang, which means “star shark”, to describe the constellation pattern on their bodies.

Whale Sharks Are A Big Treat to Guests.

A small diving resort close to where the fishing takes place discovered the fact that these whale sharks would show up on a regular basis and they started bringing their guests out there. Shortly after, everyone knew about this unusual phenomenon. Even though it’s Indonesia’s largest marine park it is still quite far down the coast and on the western side of the bay so not a lot of ships go down there. However, the ones that do, their guests are really in for a treat. Typically the whale shark feedings will start at nine in the morning and run until four in the afternoon. They will often swim around down below the platform, so divers can take pictures of them out in the blue and open water as they swim by. Everybody is guaranteed to have their personal time with the whale shark, even snorkelers, and they all come back with big smiles on their faces that they have had incredible interactions with these immense fish.

Diving Cenderawasih Bay – Dive Happy Episode 3 Show Transcript

[0:00:06.4] CM: Hello and welcome to Dive Happy, the podcast about the best places to go diving in Asia. I’m your host Chris Mitchell and I’m welcoming back for the second time, my guest, the grizzled and ocean photojournalist, Tim Rock. Welcome Tim.

[0:00:21.5] TR: Great to be back at Dive Happy Chris.

[0:00:24.7] CM: So Tim, today we’re going to talk about Cenderawasih, which is another remarkable place to go diving in Indonesia which is effectively just around the corner from Raja Ampat. Now, as far as I understand it, this area has only recently opened up, in fact, Raja as we discussed in a previous podcast, has only really been dived since the beginning of the 21st century and Cenderawasih’s been only been dived maybe for the last 10 years, would that be correct?

[0:00:56.4] TR: I’d say so, yeah. It’s fairly new, it’s not really on everybody’s dive map yet but what really kind of put it on the agenda of many divers is the fact that it has a fairly constant sighting of whale sharks where people can actually dive with them throughout the day. That really caused people to take notice and so then after that, the whole region kind of you have to get down to a certain place, “So what do we dive on the way down and whether we dive on the way back? So help us out.” All of a sudden Cenderawasih really caught everybody’s attention. It’s really paying really big dividends I think, it’s one of my favorite places in the world to dive.

[0:01:46.9] CM: Yeah, because when you look at it on the map, it’s essentially on the other side of Raja and it is like a giant has taken a bite out of the mainland isn’t it? It’s this huge great bay effectively which is, I don’t’ know, it’s hundreds of miles across right? It’s a massive area.

[0:02:05.8] TR: Oh yes it is. Part of its beauty though, you see there’s only really one way in and out of the bay up in the north, it’s been kind of isolated from the rest of the ocean world thus it has quite a few unusual endemics from anything from a long nose butterfly fish that’s different coloration than the ones we see around the world to the different kind of walking shark. People think that there’s new corals there and so I’m even kind of curious about a Mandarin fish that I took a photo of, he looks like he’s a little bit differently colored than some of the Mandarin fish that we see around the world.

So it’s really a kind of a brand new place for scientist to be looking and of course divers are hot on the scientist’s trail. I think Cenderawasih is going to really kind of open things up for a lot of the new exploration in the next five, 10 years.

[0:03:07.9] CM: Yeah, it’s really interesting because it’s sort of like a real life Jurassic park isn’t it? It is that this is a genuinely sort of undiscovered, still to be charted area. We have the outline of the map but we’re still not really sure what’s in it or the extent of what’s in it, both underwater and I guess on the land as well. Because it’s — I seem to remember, there’s basically nothing along the coast line. There’s obviously local villages but there’s nothing else really, there’s no major cities along there?

[0:03:34.4] TR: No, really no. You start at Manokwari in the north and then you go all the way down, there’s nothing until you get all the way down to the southern end of the bay again. All that coast line is pretty much just wild jungle and forest and most of the people are villagers so they just have small outrigger boats, so there’s not any real over fishing, they can’t really go out very far.

What the beauty of it is, is people start — there’s an island just north of the bay called Biak and it has a very significant World War II history and prior to that, it has a really significant local history of the Biak people. You can climb down into some skull caves and there’s areas with hundreds and hundreds of skulls where they used to go out and fight their enemies in the Padaido islands close by and they would bring back the bodies and put the skulls on the cliff line to scare away anybody that decided that they wanted to come and take over some of the Biak tribe land. So you get this really primitive vibe from the place.

[0:04:46.9] CM: They’re not messing about.

[0:04:49.4] TR: It’s got big lime stone cliffs and it’s rugged and outside of Biak city it’s kind of beautiful jungle and very nice and a lot of the ships now, like Damai, are starting out in Biak and then crossing the bay down to an island called Japen and then heading down for whale sharks and then you dive the way back up again at different dive spots. Other ships are starting in Manokwari, which is over on the western side of Cenderawasih Bay and going down the coastline. You can visit the coast line, you can visit some islands there and also a few kind of rocky points and wind up down at the whale sharks and kind of repeat on your way back.

But some of the islands out there haven’t been discovered. There’s actually a big area that’s kind of like Eastern Fields in Papua New Guinea that’s all sunken atolls that are one or two little sandy spits and you can only get up there kind of the same as the Sulu Sea, when it’s very flat calm. We did some exploration there in I believe it was July of last year on Damai and really enjoyed the diving there. It was almost like Raja Ampat with nice flowing currents and lots of schools of fish and we saw absolutely huge stands of the big cabbage coral, lettuce corals, those kind of things and I also immense barrel sponges.

The sponge life was really beautiful and I know just, there’s only about five or six dive sites actually written down that I know of in a couple of my dive guide and also Burt Jones’ dive guide, so there’s just lots more to see there, lots more to discover and that’s kind of what the excitement of Cenderawasih is, I think right now is the more boats that go down and start discovering the area and stray away from the already documented dive spots, the more we’re going to find.

Even close to the whale sharks spot, we dove on a sea mount, I think it was two years ago on Damai II and jumped in and found this really beautiful sea mount with lots of fish life and sharks and all kinds of good stuff and so it’s there for the taking and it starts all the way up north in Biak, you come south down passed Manokwari that has a lot of World War II shipwrecks, even Biak has a Catalina sea plane that you can dive on so if you’re a wreck person, you can get your fix there.

Farther down the coast, there’s a Japanese Zero sitting up on a reef and so the war stuff is available and then the regular reef areas and we found a couple of very nice places for macro too with lots of little critters like the hairy frog fish and ghost pipe fish and the tiger shrimp and all those guys, you know?

[0:08:04.2] CM: Wow.

[0:08:06.5] TR: That everybody likes — all the Macro guys love.

[0:08:08.5] CM: It’s a veritable smorgasbord and it would be possible to see the whale sharks, which we’ll get to in a minute. The whale sharks, the World War II wrecks, the macro and some of this submerged atoll, it would be possible to see that all in a one week 10 day trip? Or is it too much to take in?

[0:08:28.6] TR: Well we’ve pulled it off. Sometimes people are so anxious to get down to the whale sharks that they just steam straight down there. On a seven day trip, sometimes you miss the opportunity to dive a few of the reefs but on 10 day trip to 12 day trip, yeah, easily you can really, if the weather is working in your favor, you can go explore a lot of different places.

[0:08:54.3] CM: Yeah. Tell me a bit more about the whale sharks, why are they so prevalent in this particular area?

[0:09:01.2] TR: In most places in the world, whale sharks, they swim freely and even though they have 3,000 teeth, which are really tiny and they’re the biggest fish and biggest shark in the world, they eat really kind of microscopic plankton. So they’re always seemingly constantly on the move and so even if you go to a place where there’s a whale shark, you have to jump in and usually like crazy to get a few shots of the whale shark and then eventually you get tired and he keeps eating and swims on.

[0:09:36.5] CM: Yeah, it’s very much a drive by isn’t it?

[0:09:39.7] TR: Yeah, it is yeah. Even if they get curious, they’re still moving and so your time with them is not that glorious moment in the sea that you envision. It’s usually kind of huffing and puffing and pushing that camera in front of you, just hoping to get a couple of nice shots as it swims by. But Cenderawasih has fishing platforms that are brought up pretty much on a weekly basis up into the south central part of the bay and the people that fish on them, they’re very large platforms and there’s probably maybe eight fisherman on each platform.

They have a small generator on there and they have lights and what they do is at night, they turn the lights on and it attracts all kinds of bait fish, there’s really big nets that they drop down underneath the platform and when all the small fish show up, the haul them up and that’s part of their haul and by day they sit on the edge of the platform and they fish for whatever they can catch.

The whale sharks discovered this and started coming up and kind of trying to suck the small fish out of the net. So in order to keep the whale sharks from damaging the nets, the fishermen started feeding them. They considered them good luck and they called them hubintang, which means star shark and if you look at as the whale shark swims by, kind of looks like a constellation going across his body with all his little white dots.

[0:11:16.6] CM: It’s very beautiful.

[0:11:18.3] TR: Yeah. So there was a small diving resort close to where the fishing takes place that discovered the fact that these whale sharks would show up on a regular basis and they started bringing their guests out there and of course a couple of guests took some pictures and the next thing you know, we’ve got the internet and it’s all over the place. So Michael Aw all heard about this, he’s one of the more famous journalist in the diving world and he did a National Geographic article for it.

If anybody didn’t know about it after that, the whole world knew about it. Because it was such an unusual phenomenon and so now there are maybe a half dozen dive boats because it’s still pretty far and still pretty remote even though it’s Indonesia’s largest marine park and newest one, it’s still pretty far down the coast and on the western side of the bay. So not a lot of ships go down there but the ones that do, their guests are really in for a treat because the feeding normally starts after they’ve caught the fish and you go over and negotiate for how much fish you want to buy and how long you want to have a feeding go on.

Typically it will last a day and a half or so and the feeding will start at nine in the morning, maybe run till four in the afternoon and you don’t have to go very deep. You can go — whale sharks of course feed up at the surface so you can see them there but they have to hold themselves up in order to feed and they get a little bit tired. So then they let themselves down and they’ll swim around down below the platform, you can take pictures of them out in the blue and open water as they swim by as they do this and then they’ll circle back in and eat some more.

We’ve had as many as eight whale sharks at a time, some of the trips I’ve been on, no fewer than two. So everybody’s pretty much guaranteed to have their personal time with the whale shark and they just kind of open the dive decks on the boat and you can go over there and dive for 20 minutes, you can dive for two hours, just depending on what you want to do.

Come back, grab lunch, do a little deco time and then head back over again and so you just see people coming and going constantly and they all come back with big smiles on their faces that they’ve had this incredible interaction with these immense fish and they seem to be younger males most of them so they range in size from 10 to 12 feet up to about 30 feet and if you’re lucky you will get a couple 24 to 30 foot ones which is about half the size that they actually grow to. So that’s still really big.

[0:14:11.8] CM: Yes. They’re never small are they? Even the small ones are still very big.

[0:14:15.4] TR: Yes.

[0:14:17.9] CM: This is also, like you say, you don’t — the whale sharks are at the surface, so this is also kind of a perfect place for snorkelling as well right?

[0:14:26.9] TR: Oh snorkelers love it. Yeah they can swim with the whale sharks and most of them will swim fairly shallow at 10 feet or something like that so snorkelers can dip down and swim over the whale shark and look at them and inspect the dots on their body and really have fun. We of course ask people not to touch them but that’s usually not a problem. Everybody gets that part of it and has the fun of swimming with them and you can watch them feed because they’re feeding right at the surface and they have massive mouths where they just gulp in gallons and gallons of water at a time and really put on quite a show.

[0:15:12.7] CM: Yes, it’s one of my remarkable things I’ve ever seen. I was there four years ago now, and like you said, it’s quite interesting how rapidly the whale sharks have basically put that area on the map and the amount of boats that go there now because originally it was only one or two and they were exploratory trips and now it’s a regular part of, like you say, several boats schedules. I guess more and more boats who are happy to take on the cost of the diesel to run there, they’re going to keep doing it. I wonder how much more potential for growth it has.

[0:15:47.3] TR: Yeah, I know. I believe the village that where the park is centered there, I believe they have now purchased their own Bagan and the Bagan is the fishing platform. Now it’s — they’re a little more able to regulate what goes on and coordinate with the boats that come down so you don’t wind up with two boats showing up at once and one boat having to go off and try to find another whale shark somewhere.

[0:16:16.6] CM: Right. Yeah, exactly because…

[0:16:19.0] TR: They’re figuring it out that it’s becoming popular enough that maybe we should get this organized and they’re moving in that direction.

[0:16:28.1] CM: That’s great to hear because that’s obviously what everyone wants, isn’t it? You don’t want boats fighting over who can be in the water at what time. That kind of kills the whole experience for everyone.

[0:16:38.0] TR: It kind of takes the vibe out of the happy dive holiday. “That’s my whale shark. No, that’s my whale shark.”

[0:16:46.1] CM: Jumping back to the wrecks you mentioned.

[0:16:52.0] TR: I was going to say actually on the way down, you were mentioning the way down, there’s one rocky area that’s really superb for diving called Pulua Manguar and it’s only about two hours from where the whale sharks are so a lot of the times, the dive boats will kind of chug down overnight from Manokwari or Biak and if you’re lucky, you’ll get down to Manguar about 10 in the morning.

There’s three or four sites that we found there now that are really nice, kind of sloping walls and drop offs but there’s a series of about four different islands and that means there’s little channels between the islands and the currents run in between these channels so then of course at the end of the island, there’s a really nice point.

So we see big barracuda schools off the point and lots of the tornados of the big eye jacks, a lot of the big bump head parrot fish and that sort of thing.

This is another area where we’ve seen huge sponges, just really immense maybe six or eight of the big barrel sponges grown together. There’s a couple of walls there along the rocks that are just covered in beautiful orange soft corals and you can pretty much head down there the first day. So if you overnight and wind up down there, you can do there dives and then go over to a little place called Pulao Nusir and do a night or a dusk dive and that’s the place it has the Mandarin fish and it’s got a lot of little macro things. Then wake up the next morning and you’re at the whale shark place and it’s just 45 minutes from Nusir and spend a couple of days there and then make your way back up.

[0:18:38.0] CM: Yeah, fantastic.

[0:18:42.7] TR: I was going to say, as far as your wrecks go, most of those are around the Manokwari area so that’s on the western coast and a little bit north of where the bay kind of starts. Some of them are close to a military compound and so they won’t let you dive those wrecks but there’s at least five wrecks in the area including one big Japanese freighter and then a couple of small coastal ships, one of them still has like depth charges on it and that sort of thing.

You can get your World War II fix to start the trip off if you start up at Manokwari or you could get it as you end, as you make your way back up to finish off your diving. We’ve done it both ways and it’s really fun and the wrecks, some of the smaller wrecks. Some of the smaller wrecks are in areas with a lot of current and so they’re very pretty because they’ve got lots of sea fans and corals on them and then the slopes nearby are very good for macro photography too.

[0:19:41.3] CM: Awesome. Are the wrecks still quite intact or are they quite broken up?

[0:19:46.4] TR: It ranges. There is one that’s fairly broken up now and mostly coral, there is another one that’s fairly intact and the big freighter is totally intact and in good shape.

[0:19:59.6] CM: You mentioned earlier that zero fighter, is that still quite intact? Is it recognizably a plane still when you go down on it?

[0:20:07.0] TR: Yeah, it is, although it’s been sitting on a coral reef for about 70 plus years now. So one wing, at least a portion of one wing broke off and I’m trying to recall, I think the engine was salvaged. So you can see, there’s a cockpit and you can see that it’s a plane but there’s like sea anemones all over it and it’s a very pretty airplane now.

But some people say, “Well you see a zero and okay, that’s five minutes and then what do we do for the rest of the dive?” We found a lot of nice small little macro things in the area and plus there’s a lot of hard corals. If you’re a war guy, it’s worth stopping for.

[0:20:54.5] CM: Yeah, for sure. Really, your book, The Diving and Snorkelling Guide to Raja Ampat and Northern Indonesia, it’s probably like the first book about diving Cenderawasih in terms of a survey of what’s there, would that be true? Or has Burt and Maurine Shimlock done it already with their different books that they’ve written?

[0:21:14.2] TR: No, I think their most recent version of their guide actually covers Cenderawasih as well. I think we have a few more new things thrown in like some of the Manokwari stuff, of course the Biak area, north of Biak is an atoll called Mapia, which is almost on the equator and also almost on the edge of the Indonesian border with Palau, with the Republic of Palau waters and it’s a beautiful place to dive to and then the place that I said the Biak folks used to fight, the Padaido Islands and there’s really beautiful beaches there. There’s drop-offs, there’s the rock islands, the lime stone type of rock islands there and we’ve seen like hanging gardens of long big rope sponges there.

Lots of black corals and lots of long nose hog fish that like to live in those, so it’s all very photogenic all that whole area. Also really beautiful place for some really big sea fans. We think that if you start up north and then maybe head down through Japen along that point, there’s some really nice coral fingers that come out on the south side of Japen, and Japen is kind of the area designated, if you kind of drew a line across the bay over to the mainland on the Westside over there. So Japen is east and then you go over, it’s kind of the demarcation line where all the variation were, where all the endemics start.

So once you start diving at Japen and start going south, you’ll see all the different kinds of fish like I said, the different kind of butterfly — long nose butterfly fish. There’s a dotty back that’s only found in that area and a lot of fish that you will find because apparently the sea floor rose up quite a bit, you’ll find a lot of deep water fish in much shallower waters on the reefs here because of the sea floor, ten gazillion years ago, rose up and actually brought up a lot of the species with it. That’s another kind of special thing about that is you might see something that only deep diving gobi scientist would see but…

[0:23:45.1] CM: James Cameron’s probably there already then. Doesn’t need a bathyscope. Fantastic. So you’ve already mentioned some of the liveaboards like Damai that goes there. There are no resorts in Cenderawasih Bay are there? Or are there?

[0:24:03.4] TR: I think there is. I haven’t stayed in any there. I’ve stayed in Biak at the Papua right near the airport, which is a nice place and you can do diving in the Biak area out of that and also there’s a couple of small dive operations out of Manokwari. But as far as going down the coast, no, it’s not that developed until you get all the way down. There’s one small resort down south past the marine park in that area and yeah. But for the most part, no. It’s pretty much no man’s land down there, you’re absolutely right.

[0:24:44.5] CM: Okay. So the liveaboards, that would be Damai, Seahorse goes there as well right?

[0:24:49.3] TR: Yes.

[0:24:50.9] CM: I can’t remember the other ones, there’s definitely three or four more. Maybe Arenui goes there as well. Oh and Tambora, don’t they go there as well?

[0:25:01.3] TR: It’s been there before, yeah.

[0:25:02.5] CM: Okay. Okay cool. So in terms of where people would have…

[0:25:07.7] TR: I think what the problem is what I was mentioning a little on our talk about the early days of Raja Ampat, it’s still not that well developed for anything outside of what’s normally been going on there for quite a while. So getting provisions is a little bit tough. I think that’s why some of the ships don’t go over there and so that’s kind of good in a way because it’s really not that crowded. Usually you take off on a week or 10 days around Cenderawasih Bay, it’s unusual to run into another liveaboard, so you kind of have the whole place to yourself.

[0:25:45.1] CM: Yup. Where would you place Cenderawasih bay in terms of someone’s experience of diving? Would you say it’s a good place if you’re not that experienced or should you wait till you’re in other places, should you maybe go to someone like Raja Ampat first? Do you think there’s a certain particular pecking order?

[0:26:06.0] TR: That’s a good question, it doesn’t seem to — the bay itself doesn’t seem to have as strong currents and some of the Raja Ampat reefs. Most of them are fairly manageable so I would say even — I usually recommend for anybody who is doing the liveaboard, I’d say have a hundred dives under your belt and be at least an advanced diver. That’s kind of as a rule of thumb, but if you weren’t totally that experienced, I think you could probably manage most of the Cenderawasih Bay dives without too much problem. Yeah.

[0:26:41.4] CM: Right, okay, that’s good. In terms of actually getting there, that’s not easy.

[0:26:52.8] TR: Well you know it’s not as daunting as it used to be. Garuda has got a quite a few direct flights into Biak now. You can also fly I believe Sarong over to Manokwari and there are a few flights out of Makassar now directly over to Manokwari so depending on where your ship is going out of, Biak being about the simplest one to get to, it’s maybe two and a half hour kind of — they all seem to be red eye flights.

You get in at 5:30 or six in the morning so you’re flying out to Makassar about two or three in the morning. Like I said, the hotel is right across from the airport. You can go over there and take a nap till noon and you still have a half a day to run around and explore or if you’re one of these people who goes right from the airport to the liveaboard, you’re all set for that because you’re there first thing in the morning.

[0:27:48.6] CM: Yes, that’s right.

[0:27:50.2] TR: Me, I’m always up with the crack of noon so I usually get there a day before.

[0:27:58.5] CM: Yeah, if you were coming, obviously we live in the area and it still feels like long haul to get there for us. If you’re coming from the states, you probably want to build in like about three days either way to get to and from home?

[0:28:10.4] TR: I would say so, yeah. Then just to give yourself a break, you might want to — there’s a couple of hotels in Biak that are on the ocean that aren’t bad and you know you can catch up on your jet lag and spend a little time by the pool or sitting by the beach and do yourself a favor before you have to start diving. Nothing worse than being bone tired and diving. So yeah, give yourself three days either way.

[0:28:34.6] CM: Awesome. All right Tim. Thanks very much for telling us about diving Cenderawasih Bay and look forward to speaking to you again soon.

[0:28:41.9] TR: Yes, my pleasure and keep up the good work with the Dive Happy stuff.

[0:28:46.2] CM: Thanks Mate, take care.

[END OF INTERVIEW]

[00:28:48.7] CM: Thanks for listening to the Dive Happy Podcast. For show notes about this episode including maps of where we’re talking about, travel tips, links to the liveaboards, resorts, books etcetera that we mentioned, and other good stuff, please visit divehappy.com/podcast.

If you want to get in touch, send me an e-mail, chris@divehappy.com. If you want to know when the podcast comes out, you can sign up to the Dive Happy mailing list on the website or follow on Twitter @divehappy. Until next time, dive safe, and dive happy. Cheers.

[END]



Make Sure You Have Diving And Travel Insurance

World Nomads is one of the leading travel insurance providers and their coverage also includes scuba diving to 40 metres too if you select the relevant options. Make sure you're covered insurance-wise both above and below water.